How Graduating Students Can Get The Experience They Need To Get The Job That They Really Want.

College Grad

You have graduated from College and with your diploma in hand you now seek that job dreamed of for years.

Then you discover that companies are only looking for people with experience.

So how do you get that experience?

One great option to is to get a job as an intern.

Thousands of companies hire interns to try them out short term to see if they are right long term.

Often students will even do an internship before they leave college over the summer.

That way you can show you have some experience in your field right when you graduate.

Sometimes it is paid and sometimes not, but either way it can be very valuable.

Where can you find available internships?

You can use the more common job sites like Indeed, Careerbuilder, Monster.com or Linkedin and just search with words Intern or Internship and the chosen field you are interested in.

You can also use more specialized sites like:

Idealist.org https://www.idealist.org/en/?type=ALL

Idealist.org is a site to find positions as an intern or volunteer, or at a non-profit.

Absolute Internship  https://absoluteinternship.com/

Absolute Internship is a site for those who may be looking to travel to other countries for an internship.

Internship Programs  http://www.internshipprograms.com/

Internship Programs is essentially a landing page of internship openings from anywhere.

Way Up https://www.wayup.com/

Way Up is a site that focuses on jobs for newly graduated or current students.

Another way to find an internship is through your own Network.

Your friends, family, church or social networks. By saying “hey I am looking for an internship” you basically saying I am looking to work for free or for less than people you usually hire to get some experience.

Now that is a pretty compelling offer to someone who may need help but doesn’t have a budget to hire someone fulltime or Long-term.

Here are a few pieces of advice I would suggest to you in your internship search.

-Be flexible. Just as the ultimate job may not be readily available, the ultimate internship may not either. If Google is not available, then maybe doing Marketing for a chain of Grocery stores is.

-Treat an internship search as a job search. Put together a strategy, write a good resume, practice interviewing. Do all the things you would do if you were looking for a Career Job. Intern at looking for a job, the practice will do you good.

-Remember why you are looking for an internship, for experience. You took different classes in college to discover what career you wanted. You have dated different people to find the person you want to marry. Treat internships the same way, don’t be too afraid to make a mistake.

You never know that summer internship you took just to get some experience, could turn into the career job of your dreams!

 

 

 

Determining a Career Path and Roadmap

Career Road Map

When I was working as a headhunter one of the key questions I would ask an employer when taking a job order was what is the “Road Map” or “Career Path” of this role?

If my candidate takes this role when can they be considered for promotion?

What are the next steps in the role? What opportunities will he have in 1,2,3,5 or even 10 years down the road.

If you are interviewing for a position, this is a question you need to ask.

I have asked these questions to hiring managers when taking a job order with extremely varying answers.

Sometimes they spell it out very well.

“The reason this position has become available is that we promoted the person who was in it to manager and if he does well he can be promoted to Assistant Director and then Director.”

If you do well you could be a manager in a couple of years and on the same career path”

Sometimes it is not spelled out so well.

You ask: “what is the Career Path of this role?”

And the answer you receive is: “ I have several programmers who work for us and some have been with us for 20 years. This is a very stable company with lots of opportunities.”

What they are basically saying is there is no career path in this role. Which may be fine for maybe you are not looking for one. You have a skill, and you like doing it and do not see yourself as a Manager or a Director or Vice President someday.

But is you do aspire for a career path that moves you up to higher and higher levels in your career, somewhere in the interviewing process you need to ask “what is the career path of the job”.

What if you are already in a job and wondering what it will take to be promoted or to move to that next step and what the long-term future for you is at this company?

The first thing to do is take a personal assessment of what your career goals are.

Do I want to be a Manager, or Director or Vice President, or President or CEO

And if so does the company I work for have that possibility.

Here is what I would do.

Write down what your current job is. Title and duties or what you do.

Then write up what job you hope to be doing in 1 year. Also with a Title and duties.

Then 2 years, and 5 years and even 10 years.

Now evaluate the current company you are in and see if you can see yourself doing these roles 1, 2, 3,5 and 10 years down the road.

If not it’s OK. Maybe the opportunity in this company will only get you to Manager and after 3 years that will be as far as you go.

Does that mean you need to immediately start looking for a new position?

Not necessarily, but it does mean if you hope to move up the corporate ladder within 3 years you will need to find another role.

But at least now you have a plan and a Career Path and Roadmap on how to get there!